HINTS AND TIPS
Bookmark and Share

Estimating Tile Quantities

Step 1

Measure the length of one side of the room. If it is wall project, then measure the length of the wall running up and down.

Step 2

Measure the length of the other side of the room. If it is wall project, then measure the length of the wall running from left to right.

Step 3

Multiply the two measurements. Multiplying the length by the width provides you with the square footage of the project area. For example, if the room measures 10 feet wide by 12 feet long, multiply 10 by 12. The square footage of this room is 120 square feet.

Step 4

Translate the square footage to the amount of tile you need. Tile typically comes in boxes, and you have to buy the whole box. Divide the total square footage of the room by the total square footage of the tile in the box. In our example, let's say each box contains 10 square feet of tile. So if you need 120 square feet, 10 goes into 120 12 times, so you'll need to buy at least 12 boxes.

Step 5

Calculate the overage you'll need. You should never buy just the amount of tile you need, since you also need a bit extra for cuts, waste, breaks, and mistakes. Multiply the square footage of the room by 10%, then add this amount to the total square of the room. This is the total amount of square footage you should buy. To continue with the example we started above, .10 x 120 = 12, and 120 + 12 = 122. We'll need 122 square feet of tile.

Another reason to buy extra is if the style or color is discontinued and you need to replace a broken tile or two, you will need extras on hand to make the repairs. If you don't, then in order to fix it, you will have to replace the entire floor. The moral of the story is: Spend a little bit more up front to save money in the long run.

Most vertical applications will require trim pieces which have finished edges, this requires a linear measurement. Trim pieces will be used:

  1. Where a tiled surface ends on an open wall leaving an exposed tile edge.

  2. Where a vertical surface meets a horizontal, like on the edge of a countertop,

  3. Where a vertical surface turns a corner, like on the outside corner of a wall.

Trim pieces and decoratives are typically sold by the piece. To figure the quantity you have to establish the length of the trim piece (i.e. 6" bullnose, 8" decorative liner), then the rule is:
Linear Inches/Piece Length = Quantity

Example:

Ten foot exposed edge that needs bullnose = 120 inches.
Using 6" Trim piece = 120 inches / 6 inches = 20 pieces of bullnose needed
Using 8" decorative liner = 120 inches / 8 inches = 15 pieces of liner needed

These formulas will help you estimate the quantities you'll need.

 

Maintaining Your Carpet’s Beauty

  • The best way to ensure long–lasting beauty, comfort and durability in your carpet is to vacuum it regularly, as it prevents soil from becoming embedded in the carpet’s pile.
  • Depending on the type of carpet you have, you’ll want to use a vacuum with a rotating brush, a beater bar or suction only. If you have shag carpet, use a suction–only vacuum cleaner with no beater bar.

  • Consider professional cleaning every 12–18 months, depending on traffic and other use factors, frequency of vacuuming and whether the carpet is a light or dark color.
  • Use scissors to clip sprouts and snags; do not pull them or you may damage the carpet.
  • To remove a dent caused by heavy furniture, stroke carpet with the edges of a coin. You can also use a hair dryer or a steam iron to gently raise the dented area while you tug upward on the tufts. CAUTION: DO NOT LET THE IRON TOUCH THE CARPET.
  • If your carpet is burned, remove the tops of the dark, burnt fibers with curved fingernail scissors. If the burn is extensive, the carpet may require patching or replacement.
  • If a flooding occurs from a burst pipe, washing machine overflow or other leak, the carpet needs to be dried, front and back, by a professional cleaner with the proper equipment.

The Do's and Dont's of Laminate Care

Do’s

  • Do dust-mop and vacuum your floor frequently, especially in high-traffic  areas; only use a vacuum with a soft bristle brush.
  • Do keep pets’ nails trimmed and their paws free of dirt, gravel, grease, oil, and stains.
  • Do use protective window coverings to block fade-causing UV rays and excessive heat from direct sunlight, and rearrange rugs and furniture periodically to help your floor age evenly.
  • Do remove shoes with spiked or damaged heels before walking on floor.
  • Do avoid exposure to water as much as possible during inclement weather.

Dont's

  • Do not wet-mop or clean your floor with water or other liquid; for slightly damp maintenance, lightly spray laminate cleaner on a duster and wipe dry immediately.
  • Do not use any type of cleaning machine such as spray mops, steam cleaners/mops, power cleaners or buffing machines.
  • Do not use wax, polish, oils, soaps, detergents, shine enhancers, varnish, silicon or ammonia to clean floor.
  • Do not use harsh cleaning aids such as steel wool pads, any scouring pads containing metal or scouring powders.
  • Do not use 2-in-1 cleaners with polish that may contain acrylics or urethane polish to restore gloss.
 

A Clean Routine

Vacuum or sweep with a soft-bristle broom regularly, especially before using floor cleaners, to prevent gritty dirt and particle buildup that can scratch the floor’s surface. Don’t use vacuums with a beater bar or power rotary brush head. Wipe up spills and spots immediately using a clean cloth. Carefully remove stubborn stains such as paint, oil, markers, lipstick and tar with an acetone-based fingernail polish remover. Use ice to harden tough substances such as candle wax or chewing gum and then gently scrape with a plastic scraper, such as a credit card. Be careful not to scratch the flooring surface. Wipe area clean with a soft, slightly damp cloth.

Floor Mats Protect Your Floors

High-quality floor mats at entrances and exits are key to reducing tile wear. They collect and trap all the corrosive substances that can be tracked in from outdoors, including dirt, sand, grit, oil, asphalt, or even driveway sealer. Also use mats in areas of constant pressure, such as in front of vanities, kitchen sinks and stoves.

Protective Pads On Furniture — A Good Idea

Attach felt or similar protective pads to all furniture legs, particularly heavy pieces. When you’re moving furniture, appliances or other heavy objects, use a dolly; never slide or roll anything across the floor. If furniture has hard plastic or metal casters/wheels, use protective mats underneath or replace them with soft rubber casters.